35 Comments

  • says:

    Are any of these made in the USA

    • says:

      Gelish mentioned in their website that they have a facility in Brea, California. It’s a possibility their polygel is made in America.

  • says:

    Do I need a course or nail technician certificate before offering Polygel as a service to clients?

    • says:

      It is recommended that you complete an accredited training for Polygel as it is completely different nail system compared to acrylic nails and nail gels. Keep in mind, you need to be professionally trained in the application of tips and sculpting as most of Polygel workshops don’t cover these skills.

  • says:

    Can you use false acrylic nails as a substitute for the dual forms?

  • says:

    I just used Gelish for the first. I loved it however the product didnt set up as expected I have an OPI lamp and even after 60 seconds it didnt harden completely. I did another 120 and it was still soft. the next the nails has improved however still soft. Is this to be expected?

  • says:

    I’m allergic to acrylic and have been using builder gel for years. Can I use polygel/hybrid gels?

    • says:

      Gel, acrylic and gel polish nails all contain methacrylates, polygel mixture contains acrylic and it may affects those who have allergy to acrylic. Skin experts are warning a chemical found in gel, gel polish and acrylic nails can cause an allergic reaction. Methacrylate chemicals can cause a severe, itchy rash anywhere on the body, not just the fingertips.

  • says:

    Can I use polygel as a glue?

  • says:

    Can acrylic liquid be used as polygel liquid?

    • says:

      Acrylic nails are an extension on your natural nail. In order for them to be applied, your natural nail bed is filed down to create a rough surface for the glue to be able to adhere the nail extension to. Once this is done, acrylic liquid and powder are mixed together to create the acrylic that is applied on top to mould the artificial nail. This will be shaped and buffed, and then painted with either regular or gel polish.

    • says:

      Does Polygel cause peeling and yellowing to the nails?

      • says:

        Polygel is not inherently bad for your nails. As long as it is removed properly, polygel should pose no harm to nails. Still, it’s good to take a break from Polygel—or any polish or nail enhancement, for that matter—from time to time.

    • says:

      The liquid used to sculpt PolyGel is known as “slip,” and the word was taken from the clay-sculpting slip that potters use. Slip is not a monomer; it lacks active components and, in contrast to acrylic monomer, has a mild, pleasant scent. It serves only to simplify the shaping process for polygel.

  • says:

    Is there any way to apply more polygel once it’s been cured and I already added the top coat? Sometimes I notice that my extension is too thin and needs additional product or else it will break, but I don’t want to start from scratch I.e removal process

    • says:

      To solve this problem, try to add more polygel to make an apex and put more polygel at the tips. After you do these two things, you will have thicker apex and and thicker nails at the end tips after you shape and shorten them.

  • says:

    Where did the poly gel come from?

  • says:

    All these Polygel products are easy to be applied to nails, and the best thing about them is the odor is not annoying at all compared to other nail sculpting gels.

    • says:

      My first attempt at Polygel nails was a disaster. I didn’t realize I needed professional training and ended up with a mess of acrylic on my fingertips. The itchy rash that followed was not worth the trendy nails. Stick to the salon for this one.

  • says:

    I love this product! I’ve tried multiple times over the years to do acrylic nails, and they never looked professional, nor did they stay on. The polygel goes on so quickly. I watched tutorials and followed the directions. The kit comes with a brush and it works well. Also, I bought an e-file, and that made a big difference too. Plus, there is no smell and little to no dust floating around. I am beyond happy with this product.

    • says:

      Acrylic nails may give you fabulous fingertips, but beware the perils of methacrylate allergies and rough filing. Opt for polygel for a smoother, smell-free nail extension experience.

  • says:

    I can’t live without polygel, I applied it by myself, and this was my first time using a professional-only product. Now I am no professional, but watch tons of videos on the application, and I did make lots of errors but realized what they were and will try harder next time. practice makes perfect. Some nails I got too thick, but as I went along, that got better. Still love the product. I bought lite pink from gelish and I could have gotten away without polish it looks so good. I hope all supplies will be available. Some people can’t afford salons but want to keep up with the trend.

    • says:

      I can’t live without polygel???? Oh my gosh, Polygel is, like, the worst thing ever. I don’t know how anyone can work with it without wanting to pull their hair out. It’s like trying to sculpt with Jell-O or something. But I guess it gives you those super long, sturdy nails, so whatever. I don’t know; I feel like other options have to be available, right? Like, what about acrylics or something? I think those are made from some kind of liquid and powder. Or maybe gel nails? Those are cured with a light or something, right? I think they last for a long time too. And then there are those nail wraps or press-on nails. I feel like those would be easier, but I don’t know.

  • says:

    I have tried ibd polygel it is excellent, and the clarity is great, only a tiny bit foggy (but it could be a user error). Very easy to move, not runny, and blends from bead to bead easily and smoothly. Cures completely in a good UV LED lamp. Very easy to file and shape.

  • says:

    How do you remove polygel from your nails?

    • says:

      Soak in 100% Acetone for 5 to 15 minutes and then the polygel will get softened and can be easily scraped off.

    • says:

      Polygel is a soak-off gel, or you can remove it by filing it off. Because it is a soft gel, it is very easy to file off using an e-file or by hand.

  • says:

    I’m a novice at nail and nail art. The PolyGel from ibd has been very easygoing when applied, sturdy, great looking, and very easy to learn with.

  • says:

    After spending a couple of weeks searching for a “perfect nude polygel”. This 👏 was👏 it 👏. Gelish polygel is the perfect cover nude, and it’s very opaque. It is worth buying. Also has a nice consistency & easy to use. Be sure to cure for the proper time, especially because it’s so opaque. I cured my nails for an extra 30 seconds just to be sure.

  • says:

    I absolutely adore Gelish Polygel (and I’ve tried many). Perfect color for a nice, natural-looking nail that moves freely without sticking to my brush… which means less waste mucking around with gel collecting on brush and then slipping solution. It makes it easier to apply the right amount, just a dream to work with. Thank you, Gelish. Given the higher price, but larger size compared to many polygels, it is worthwhile to purchase. 

  • says:

    Polygel is a nail game-changer, but be sure to get professionally trained before trying it out. Otherwise, you might end up with a methacrylate-induced itchy rash on your fingertips and beyond.

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